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History of the formation of present day Palestine

MARKET OF PALESTINE

Palestine theoretically includes the West Bank (a territory that sits between modern-day Israel and Jordan) and the Gaza Strip (which borders modern-day Israel and Egypt)

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  • Palestine
Palestine theoretically includes the West Bank (a territory that sits between modern-day Israel and Jordan) and the Gaza Strip (which borders modern-day Israel and Egypt)

On November 29, 1947, the UN General Assembly, by a two-thirds majority vote, approved the United Nations General Assembly resolution (Resolution 181 of the UN General Assembly), which seeks to end the Arab-Israeli conflict. The Arab-Jewish Conflict was intended to divide the land of Palestine into Jewish and Arab states, and to control most of Jerusalem, which included Bethlehem, by international forces. 

Jewish leaders (including the Jewish Agency) accepted the plan, but Palestinian Arab leaders rejected it and refused to negotiate. Neighboring Arab and Muslim countries also opposed the partition plan. After the Arab High Committee declared a riot in Jerusalem in 1947, the Arab community reacted violently and clashed, resulting in the burning of many buildings and shops. As military conflicts between Palestinian and Jewish militias continued in Palestine, British rule over Palestine ended on May 15, 1948, the day before the founding of the State of Israel had been announced (see The Establishment of the State of Israel). 

Arab neighbors and their armies (Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, Egypt, Jordan, Jihad Army, Arab Liberation Army, and local Arabs) invaded the country shortly after Israel declared independence, followed by the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. As a result, the plan to divide Palestine never materialized.

What is the term of Palestine?
Since the 1960s, the term "Palestine" has been used interchangeably in political contexts. Various declarations, such as the declaration of an independent Palestinian state in 1988 by the Palestine Liberation Organization, referred to a country called Palestine, and defined its borders with varying degrees of clarity, including calling for the annexation of the whole of Israel to Palestine. 

Most recently, a draft of the Palestinian constitution based on the West Bank and Gaza Strip ‎ defined the borders of Palestine before 1967 (the Six-Day War). This Green Line (Israel) is designated by the 1949 Interim Firefighting Agreement, and negotiations on defining permanent boundaries have not yet taken place. In addition, since 1994, the Palestinian Authority has taken control of various parts of ancient Palestine.

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